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What's going on with ATLAS?

As Costs Come Down ATLAS is Poised to be the Leading Provider of Access to Space

Blue Origin, Jeff Bezos’ spaceflight company, has successfully launched and landed their suborbital, reusable rocket. A massive breakthrough for the New Space community. For years now, rockets have fallen back down to earth and crash to a watery grave – but not for long.

Blue Origin’s New Shepard rocket lifted off from their launch facility in Van Horn Texas and traveled up to 100km into space before descending back to earth. Upon the rockets reentrance, the thrusters powered back on to allow a safe landing.

Traditionally launches have been a once and done deal and end up costing millions of dollars. Reusable rockets could be a breakthrough for launching spacecraft – particularly SmallSats. With the booming SmallSat market continuing to show impressive growth, a cost effective launch solution is becoming painfully necessary. 

Blue Origin isn’t the only company racing to develop a reusable rocket. Companies such as Elon Musk’s SpaceX and Chris Craddock’s RocketStar are just two other companies currently developing reusable rockets in the race to create affordable access to space. 

With companies being able to produce SmallSats for a much smaller cost than traditional satellites, these companies are also in need of affordable launches as well as TT&C and data management – that’s where ATLAS comes in. 

ATLAS has poised itself to be the leading provider of TT&C and data management for the blossoming SmallSat market. Built around the ATLAS Freedom software platform, ATLAS has developed a proprietary way to cut costs without skimming on quality. This new approach combined with a network of ‘white label’ cooperative antennas allows ATLAS to offer the lowest price on the market for global coverage.

The New Space industry is rapidly growing and the race is on to provide affordable access to space.